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Pesticide residues complicate fertility treatments

Pesticide residues complicate fertility treatments

Through an observational study it was concluded that eating more fruits and vegetables with a high content of pesticides is associated with a lower probability of pregnancy and birth after infertility treatment for women using assisted reproductive technologies.

The results of Harvard's Jorge E. Chavarro and his colleagues were that eating more fruits and vegetables high in pesticides (for example, raw strawberries and spinach) is associated with a lower probability of pregnancy and birth after infertility treatment While eating more low-pesticide fruits and vegetables was not associated with worse pregnancy and live birth outcomes.

The research also draws conclusions on the exposure or ingestion of agrochemicals in early pregnancy. The pesticide residue levels allowed in food by the US Environmental Protection Agency are still too high for pregnant women and infants.

How was the pesticide study

Researchers from the T.H. Chan from Harvard University, in Boston, United States, analyzed 325 women who completed a questionnaire about their diet and subsequently underwent cycles of assisted reproductive technologies as part of the 'Environment and Reproductive Health' study (EARTH, in a fertility center at a Boston university hospital.

It is an observational study. In observational studies, the authors observe exposures and outcomes for patients as they occur naturally in clinical care or real life.

With information from:


Video: Understanding Pesticide Residue Risks in Food: MRLs (August 2021).